Objective 1: the end of poverty

Objective 1: the end of poverty
Above, Bouraga, Tagant (Mauritania), 2008; below, Copenhagen (Denmark), 2017 © Francisco Sánchez Aguado

Objective 1: the end of poverty

An individual’s poverty may be due to many causes, but one of them, and perhaps the most unjust of them, Is the luck of being born in one place or another. Just as the genetic make-up inherited from our parents makes us blond or dark-haired, or clear or dark-skinned with no merit or responsibility on our part, being born in certain parts of the world means that, from the start, our opportunities for developing are radically different.

These differences are illustrated by the two groups of children shown, those above photographed in an African village, alone, barefoot, some of them naked, and in an unhealthy environment where there is nothing aplenty, while those below were photographed in a city in Northern Europe, in safe surroundings, suitably dressed and fed, and watched over by adults in a place specifically for playing and socialising.

Given the above, and although, according to the UN 42% of people in Sub-Saharan Africa still subsist in conditions of extreme poverty in 2013 (daily income of 1.25 US$), there are pockets of poverty in all countries, including the most defeloped ones, which is yet another manifestation of inequality.

Among the goals of Objective 1 (Revitalising the World Alliance for Sustainable Development) are the eradication of extreme poverty for all the people in the world by 2030 and, for the same year, reduce by at least a half the proportion of men, women and children of all ages who live in poverty in all its dimensions according to national definitions of the same.