Moving to the uplands in springtime

Moving to the uplands in springtime
2010. Giuseppe Minchella riding on Serena, her favourite mare. Photo Dario Novellino © Dario Novellino

Moving to the uplands in springtime

Numerous plant species are used for the construction of collars for cows, horses, and goats, these are often engraved with geometric and floral motifs. Because of its strength and flexibility, Mediterranean hackberry (Celtis australis) is the most widely used for this purpose. Other trees are also used, such as species of the genus Acer, as well as beech (Fagus sylvatica subsp. sylvatica), hornbeam (Carpinus betulus), Judas tree (Cercis siliquastrum), terebinth (Pistacia terebinthus), black mulberry (Morus nigra), elm (Ulmus campestris), willow (Salix spp.), golden chain (Laburnum anagyroides) and ash (Fraxinus ornus). Various typologies of bells, having different timbre qualities, are attached to collars. 

Transhumance does not consist, solely, in the physical crossing of a given territory; it is rather a form of space appropriation through sounds that are the cumulative acoustic experiences of previous transhumance. Ricci (1996) has argued that pastoralists perceive the crossing with herds of a populated area, as a form of «social redemption» through sound and visual ostentation. This ostentation is reflected in expressions such as «ce le so fatte vedé de passà» [«I made them see (my animals)] or «ce le se fatte sentì’» [I made them hear (my bells)].

 

See video 1 

See vídeo 2